Roll for Zinc Research

Friend of the blog A/Prof Paul Adlard teamed up over the weekend with Kingsley Just to attempt a new Guinness World Record for the most consecutive rolls completed by an aircraft. Kingsley attempted this feat to help raise money for research into disorders of zinc metabolism. The previous record stood at 408, which is more than enough to make your head spin. See how he did after the jump…

Kingsley’s reasons for wanting to try this out are far from loopy:

My little boy Kaelan has been diagnosed with an extremely rare genetic condition which is a variant of Acrodermatitis Enteropathica (AE) – the symptoms are unpleasant and affect his quality of life. AE is caused by his inability to metabolise zinc, leading to a deficiency. Traditional treatment helped a lot, but in some areas we still find it hard to manage his condition. There is very little research in this area, and understanding how to treat or manage this condition is poor.

Here’s Kaelan with the plane, pre-attempt…

Kaelan and plane

 

…and here’s the plane, sans-Kaelan and mid-roll:

Flying

So, after a few heart-stopping moments, Paul tells us that unofficial count was a massive 987 rolls, smashing the old record by 579. Of course, we need to wait for the folks at Guinness to sober up and make it official, but we’d say this is a record that’ll hang around for a while.

You can still contribute to the cause by heading over to the donations page at Everyday Hero, were Kingsley and Paul have almost hit the $5,000 mark.

 

 

Posted in Metal filings: Odds and ends from around the web

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